Tuesday, July 17, 2012

The Stars Shine Bright by Sibella Giorello


In this latest in the series, FBI Agent Raleigh Harmon is back in the Seattle office. She is still under review from her Alaska cruise ship experience but is given an under cover assignment. She poses as the niece of a wealthy race horse owner and has the task of investigating why horses that have been winning suddenly begin to lose.
In addition to dealing with arrogant trainers and betting mobsters, she also has Jack as her immediate contact with the FBI. Jack, with his irritating sense of humor and apparent infatuation with Raleigh. And then her fiancé, DeMott, insists on flying out from Richmond with the dog dying for Raleigh's affection.
Raleigh's life is in danger as someone is out to harm the horses and get rid of her. And she puts her own career in danger (again) as she goes outside the bounds of accepted FBI protocol to track down the criminals. While she uncovers the animal loving terrorists who have been causing damage in the Pacific Northwest for years, she may be also ruining her career.

I really like this series. Giorello is a gifted author. There is snappy dialog, quirky characters, and faith lived out in the day to day activities of Raleigh. Add to that the informative descriptions of the varied landscape of Washington State, from the scablands of eastern Washington to fault ridden Puget Sound. Geological background information is deftly woven into the story line. Living the Pacific Northwest, it is a treat to read about familiar places in a novel. And Giorello gets extra points for having Jack mention Deception Pass, a nearby favorite of mine.

This is a well written novel. Although it is the fifth book in a continuing series, Giorello weaves in enough background information from previous books that you won't be lost if this is the first you read.

“The stars shine bright when it gets dark enough. The invisible becomes visible.” (269)

Find out more about the author and her books at http://sibellagiorello.com/


I am taking part in a blog tour and you can read other reviews of this beek here.

Thomas Nelson, 400 pages.

I received a complimentary egalley of this book from the publisher for the purpose of this review.
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